Click Clack of Needles

Many moons ago, my grandma tried to teach me to knit. I think she was fairly successful. I just never really made anything. Other hobbies came and went and I didn’t really do the whole knitting thing. Enter grad school. Part way through my second year, I picked up a knitting book from the bargain section of a book store. A few of my friends in the program were doing knitting and crocheting. It all had me very intrigued. I had some decent craft hobbies at the time (namely scrapbooking and card making). However, I wanted something that would occupy my hands while I watched tv or a movie. I wanted to be able to step away from the hectic life that is grad school and vegetate. Plus, towards the end of my second year of grad school, I was gearing up for my summer out in Oregon. Knitting would be the perfect crafting hobby because it didn’t take up much room (at the time) and it was very transportable.

At the time I started knitting, we had been without my grandma for about a year. No longer were we (my family) the recipients of dish clothes, slippers, mittens, graduation afghans, or baby blankets. Those were the commonly knit items that I remember from my childhood. She also would knit these awesome sweater vests when we were kids. I remember this specific one that had bunnies on it. When I started knitting, I thought I was taking on a hobby to engage my mind for relaxation. Looking back, I think I started knitting as a way to be close to my grandma again. To continue the tradition of creating and giving.

Recently, I had the pleasure of creating and giving away two baby blankets to two of my cousins. One was knit and one was crocheted. The crocheted blanket went a cousin on my dad’s side of the family (opposite side of the grandma that I’ve been talking about). She loved the blanket and I had fun making it. I recently picked up crocheting again (I learned this skill at some point during my childhood from my mother).

Crochet blanket – striped with shell stitching on the edge

Another close up of the crochet blanket with the yarn. Having fun with my new camera!

Full crochet blanket

Okay, so back to knitting. The cousin that would be receiving the knit blanket is on my mom’s side of the family. She adored our grandma as well. I think us 4 grandkids were all deeply affected by our grammy’s passing and it can still be tough (at least for me) to deal with, even three years later. Like writing this post right now…kind of emotional. Anyway, Terri was going to be the first of us 4 to have a baby. She also wasn’t going to be receiving one of grandma’s knit baby blankets. These baby blankets were made for pretty much anyone in the family having a baby. My mom still has the one knit for when I was born! Luckily, one of my aunts was still in possession of this baby blanket pattern. Once I started knitting, my aunt gifted me the left over knitting item’s of my grandma’s that she still had. Now I have the baby blanket pattern. I couldn’t think of a more perfect gift for Terri once she announced at Christmastime that she’d be having a baby this summer.

Full finished knit blanket

I thought I’d share the pattern because it works up a beautiful baby blanket. So, if you’re a knitter, you might want to try it! The pattern itself, is fairly easy…just knit and purl. However, the pattern requires meticulous attention. If you get off at all, it will show. I had to work with the pattern for quite some time before I felt comfortable bringing it to work on during my knitting group. Without further ado, here’s the pattern for my grandma’s baby blanket. (K= knit and P= purl)

Finished size: about 27×32″

Size 8 or 10 circular needles (I used 8 and they worked just fine)

Cast on 119 stitches

Knit 8 rows for border

Row 1: K4, place stitch marker, K7, *P1, K7 repeat from * across to last 4 stitches, place another stitch marker, K4

Row 2 (& all even rows): K4, slip marker, K the K stitches and P the P stitches as they face you across to marker, slip marker, K4

Row 3: K4, slip marker, *P1, K5, P1, K1, repeat from * to 7 stitches before marker, P1, K5, P1, slip marker, K4

Row 5: K4, slip marker, K1, P1, *K3, P1, repeat from * to last stitch before marker, K1, slip marker, K4

Row 7: K4, slip marker, K2, P1, K1, P1, *K5, P1, K1, P1, repeat from * to 2 stitches before marker, K2, slip marker, K4

Row 9: K4, slip marker, K3, *P1, K7, repeat from * to 4 stitches before marker, P1, K3, slip marker, K4

Row 11: Repeat row 7

Row 13: Repeat row 5

Row 15: Repeat row 3

Row 16: Repeat row 2

Repeat rows 1-16 for pattern to 31″ from beginning

Knit 8 rows

Bind off

Showing both the front and back of the blanket. The back has raised edges of the diamond pattern.

Close up of the front of the knit blanket.

 

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9 thoughts on “Click Clack of Needles

  1. bellechan says:

    I found this page through Pinterest and the diamond blanket pattern is exactly the look I was hoping for for the next baby blanket I need to do. Thank you for sharing! ๐Ÿ™‚

  2. Jeannine says:

    I too found this on Pinterest, Love the pattern and the story behind it. Thanks for sharing. I am wondering if you remember what yarn you used to knit the blanket with?

    • ellenhatfield says:

      Hi Jeannine! Thanks for commenting. I’m pretty sure that I just used the baby sport yarn in the Michael’s Impeccable brand for this particular blanket. I’ve also used the Red Heart Gumdrop yarn for this pattern and I love how it works up.

  3. Knitting Psalms says:

    Thanks so much for the Diamond Baby Blanket pattern. Just finished one for my new grand-niece. Ready to start another one – love, love LOVE the pattern. Blessings, Knitting Psalms

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